Teflon Cleaning

Monday, October 1, 2007


Here are some tips I found on Teflon cleaning (especially trying to clean up egg residue) from different posts all over the web:

RE: How to Clean Teflon

Ladyvmh. (Guest Post) | 06/17/2004

If you are using a cooking spray (such as PAM) it will leave a sticky residue that is almost impossible to get off. Instead use oil brushed on with a pastry brush. When I first heard this I thought it was dumb, but since I quit using the sprays I have not had to replace any Teflon Pans. (Also Teflon should never be used over anything higher than Medium heat. I don't buy the sprays at all any more. Amazing how much easier it is to wash, not just Teflon, but casserole dishes, pans, etc. Good luck


RE: How to Clean Teflon

Jacque (Guest Post) | 06/16/2004

Use electric dish washing powder and soak overnight in the solution. Will clean up easy next day.


RE: How to Clean Teflon

Anne H. (Guest Post) | 06/16/2004

I would try straight white vinegar too. It seems too work well on grease and residue in general.


RE: How to Clean Teflon

Connie. (Guest Post) | 06/15/2004

For Nancy in Pennsylvania trying to clean her Teflon. Use baking soda on a damp cloth and rub on the stains. This will take them off and not hurt the Teflon.


RE: How to Clean Teflon

Tawnda (Guest Post) | 06/15/2004

You can buy teflon-safe scrubby sponges, but I use a scrubby that my sister crocheted out of that netting you buy by the yard in the fabric store. It doesn't scratch the teflon, and it works as good as an S.O.S. pad! If you don't have anyone that crochetes, you can get some of the netting and fold in half at least once and wrap it around a scrub brush and rubber band it on the top.

More on Teflon cleaning

Here is a great tip for cleaning Teflon.

Mix up a combination of 1 cup water, 1/2 cup vinegar and 2 teaspoons of baking powder in the pan.

Now just clean rinse and dry as normal. Don't forget to season the pan again the next time that you use it.

Another Tip:

I've loosened some things by soaking (overnight sometimes) with baking soda. About 3-4 TBSP (I just dump some out of the smallish box), fill the pan with water, and leave it alone for a while.
Yep, soak in cold, NOT hot water with some dishwashing detergent for 20 mins, then clean with a scourer. It'll come straight off.

Solution? When the food's done cooking, put it on a serving platter, throw a few cups of water in the pan, and return to the stove over medium heat until it boils for a few minutes. Most of the time, the egg that's stuck to the bottom floats up as a solid sheet of its own accord.


However

Teflon has been linked to cancer.

If you learn to season your cast iron pan with salt and oil you will achieve the same results as a teflon pan without potentially poisoning your family. You'll also get yourself a dose of iron every time you use it.
No matter how much oil I use with an enameled cast iron (usually white), the eggs stick. With lots of oil on stainless steel, only medium stickage. Well-seasoned cast iron, nearly instantaneous cleanup.

I was always taught to wash eggy stuff in cold water

YES! Use cold water first! Hot water cooks the eggs on more. I'm not a chemist, just someone who likes eggs.
Immediately put some cold water in the pan, and once all the egg is off, wash it with soap and hot water.

Important article on Teflon:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/07/dining/07pans.html?ex=1307332800&en=0e321b5eed482773&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

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